Posts Tagged ‘juicystar07’

A Social Enterprise view on Klout

Posted on: January 3rd, 2012 by Fransgaard 15 Comments

This article is the first in a series of blog posts I will be writing on The Social Enterprise here as well as on the Capgemini technology blog Capping IT Off.

The blog battles of Klout is raging on and probably will continue into 2012. But as I have written before I think a lot of people are making the situation much worse, or better, than it is and I think it is because many digital professionals, being social media users themselves, think of social media as a user would rather than a business.

First impressions last

We are all judged from the moment we meet somebody else. What we say, what we look like and how we behave.

We are also measured by companies wanting our customs but using different parameters: The spending power we have, how loyal we are, how well we fit with a specific brand vision and our ability to influence others. The information helps determine who are more valuable and even who should be given special VIP treatments.

As we, the customers, moved online business adjusted these parameters to fit new data such as online behaviour, site loyalty and digital contact opportunities. All this data helps companies understand our needs. No point selling a electrified cow fence to a would-be Britpop star living in the heart of Camden Town, London.

The importance of social customer relationships

With the dawn of social media knowing customers is even more important to be able to provide that elusive personalised service. Social networks also brought a whole new world of influence created instantly from previously unknown sources. Social media allows a girl named Juicystar07 to suddenly can gain millions views simply by voicing her opinion on fashion on YouTube.

How can businesses spot those customers who are influential in the digital social sphere? While not perfect, services like Klout provide measurable and comparable data that can hint to customers’ influential powers online.

Social CRM: The multi-faceted customer profile

But CRM professionals are not stupid. They understand the limitations of Klout and they know better than anyone to interpret a multi-faceted customer profile.

Let’s look at the customers Eva and Paul:

  • Eva’s profile was created in June 2008.
  • Since then she has spend an average of £263 a month.
  • Her husband and oldest son are both registered customers as well.
  • Her Klout is 14.
  • Paul’s profile was created March 2011 when he made his first (and so far only) purchase of £14.99.
  • No other customer profile is attached to Paul’s profile.
  • His Klout is 43.

Apply common sense and Eva stands out as the better customer. Paul’s significantly higher Klout is only a single facet of the complete customer profile which overall is in Eva’s favour.

But if we amend the profiles, things look different:

  • Eva’s profile was created in June 2008.
  • Since then she has spend an average of £263 a month.
  • Her husband and oldest son are both registered customers as well.
  • Her Klout is 14.
  • Paul’s profile was created March 2011.
  • Since then he has spend an average of £98 a month.
  • No other customer profile is attached to Paul’s profile.
  • His Klout is 68.

Suddenly the profiles are much closer in value greatly helped by the Paul’s Klout score.

What do you think?

The above is not theory. In 2011 digital monitoring tool Radian6 teamed up with Klout to incorporate the ability to measure using Klout scores and Radian6 is owned by SalesForce who is a market leader in cloud-based CRM tools.

What are your thoughts on Klout and Social CRM? Can companies really afford not to consider measurement tools such as Klout when creating customer profiles?

Is the non-digital native generation missing the real value of Generation C’s user generated content?

Posted on: September 20th, 2011 by Fransgaard 1 Comment

Often when I go to digital events and conferences I can help but wish I had a time machine so I could go back in time and scream “I TOLD YOU SO!” in the faces of those who were adamant that the Internet was a toy and a fad.

Alas, I don’t have a time machine. But some times events happens that makes me think that I am doing the same mistake now as these non-believers did back then.

JuicyStar07

Such an event happened at SalesForce‘s recent CloudForce conference here in London where I joined a break-out session by the social sentiment company Radian6.  The presenter wanted to show how the Radian6 product helps companies filter social comments and identify the ones with the “loudest megaphone”. He proceeded to show a YouTube entry made by a beautiful young woman going by the screen name “JuicyStar07”.

JuicyStar07

When the presenter said the words “JuicyStar07” there were several semi-naughty grins from the audience who assigned some sexually charged undercurrents to her screen name and the presenter was quick to state that the video was PG.

The presenter continued to play the video in which JuicyStar07 was talking about her Louis Vuitton Speedy 35 bag and he brought to our attention that the video had received a stunning 2,000,000 views significantly more than the audience of most printed publications. Think about that for a second: More views than most newspapers have readers! How’s that for reach and influence?

Everybody instantly sobered up. No more naughty winks from the audience and we all realised the sheer scale of the reach this single video have. The presenter then posed the question: Shouldn’t Luis Vuitton reach out to JuicyStar07?

It highlights how easy it is to miss the real value of content produced by digital natives simply because of the presumptions we project on to what we see. We saw a young person seemingly rambling on about fashion nonsense. But the truth is not only does she know what she’s talking about, she also has a large crowd of loyal followers who are naturally suspicious and  largely immune to traditional advertising. She is the future of product promotion.

Is the Google+ common name policy missing the value as well?

Is the name “JuicyStar07” intended to be sexually charged? I don’t know. Maybe it was when she came up with the screen name, who knows?. Fact is: It does not matter. 

What matters is that changing her screen name would be PR suicide and I am convinced she is aware of this. Some of her fans may not recognise her as Blair Fowler but they all know and want JuicyStar07.

These were my thoughts at the time. I’ve since learned she is blogging under her real name as well but it still raises yet another issue with the whole utopian Google+ real name policy which my colleague Rick Mans has covered in another blog post. Sufficient here is to ask: Do Google really want to risk losing somebody like JuicyStar07 and her 2,000,000 views in a crusade to force them to use their real name?

Thoughts spawned by CloudForce 2011

Posted on: September 15th, 2011 by Fransgaard 6 Comments

This post was meant to be a continuously updated summary of Day 2 at CloudForce, London. However, there’s already a suite official material online and I am sure what is not covered by this will be covered by various blog posts and ofcourse the #cloudforce Twitter tag.

Instead I want to share a few thoughts provoked by this very inspiring day.

For example I found it interesting that while Peter Coffee was interviewing a range of interesting guest speakers on stage we were all staring at the video feed from the camera filming him… we weren’t looking at him standing there in flesh and blod, no we were looking not only at a screen projection of him; we were looking at a video feed embedded on a Facebook page projected on the big screen.

I also find it interesting how we experience live events through our cameras. It is like if we don’t capture it digitally it didn’t happen. I remember last year going to MovieCon and having to hand over my iPhone before we could enter to here about all the new movies coming this year. It was an unpleasant experience not being able to share all these great secrets with my online contacts.

JuicyStar07

JuicyStar07But the single event that stands out in my head happened during the Radian6 breakout session where the presenter wanted to show how Radian6 helps companies filter social comments and identify the ones with the “loudest megaphone”. He proceeded to show a YouTube entry made by a beautiful young woman going by the screen name “JuicyStar07”.

When the presenter said the words “JuicyStar07” there were several semi-naughty grins from the audience who assigned some sexually charged undercurrents to her screen name and the presenter was quick to state that the video was PG.

The presenter continued to play the video in which JuicyStar07 was talking about her Louis Vuitton Speedy 35 bag and he brought to our attention that the video had received a stunning 2,000,000 views significantly more than the audience of most printed publications. Think about that for a second: More views than most newspapers have readers.

Everybody instantly sobered up. No more naughty winks from the audience and we all realised the sheer scale of the reach this single video have. The presenter then posed the question: Shouldn’t Luis Vuitton reach out to JuicyStar07?

It highlights how easy it is to miss the real value of content produced by digital natives simply because of the presumptions we project on to what we see.

Is the name “JuicyStar07” intended to be sexually charged? I don’t know. Maybe it was when she came up with the screen name, who knows?. Fact is: It does not matter. 

What matters is that changing her screen name would be PR suicide and I am convinced she is aware of this. Some of her fans may not recognise her as Blair Fowler but they all know and want JuicyStar07.

These were my thoughts at the time. I’ve since learned she is blogging under her real name as well but it still raises yet another issue with the whole utopian Google+ real name policy which my colleague Rick Mans has covered in another blog post. Sufficient here is to ask: Do Google really want to risk losing somebody like JuicyStar07 and her 2,000,000 views in a crusade to force them to use their real name?

The Burberry Social Enterprise

I want to end this post with a personal note: It was great seeing the project I am User Experience Lead on up on the big screen.